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Monday, October 18, 2010 5:01 AM

Did St. John’s of Delphos or St. Marys High School win the basketball game which was played in that city Wednesday evening? A peculiar controversy has developed over this question. The exceptional part of the controversy is the fact that each side claims to have lost.
The Delphos boys returned from St. Marys and stated that they had lost in a close and hotly contested game, giving a score of 24 to 22. the St. Marys Evening Leader, however, comes out with a statement that Delphos won the game by a score of 24 to 22.
We do not intend to enter into an argument with The Leader in the matter. We will waive all our rights in the controversy and allow The Leader to have its own way. We might say in passing that this is the first time we have ever known both sides to claim defeat.
The Leader item follows:
A high school boy’s basketball game Wednesday night at armory hall, St. Marys, resulted in a score of 22 and 24 in favor of Delphos. The event was closely contested as indicated by the scratch score. The visitors are entitled to the credit of putting up the kind of playing that won the laurels. The defeat is the first this season of the St. Marys high school team. St. John’s has won 12 and lost 6 games. The event closed the high school basketball season.
Delphos Herald, Mar. 18, 1921

Says No To
Vaccination

There is an elderly lady in my parish who was born and raised in Hessen-Darmstadt, Germany. In her young maiden-hood she was vaccinated almost annually. A few months after the sixth vaccination she became sick with malignant smallpox, was hustled off to the pest house, hovered between life and death for a number of weeks, but finally recovered. She came to America and now resides on a farm west of Delphos. If the Delphos Health Board desires to verify my statement I shall gladly give them her name. She designates vaccination: “A breeder of smallpox.”
My own father, a German, was vaccinated every three years of his life in Germany, according to law. His last vaccination was six weeks before his departure for America. He came direct to Massillon, Ohio, arriving there in August. In November he took sick of the malignant kind of smallpox, and it was four months before he recovered sufficiently to do any work. He carried the scars to his grave. His advice to his children was: “Never get vaccinated. Vaccination is the greatest fraud on earth.”
(This was written by Reverend Father Rupert, pastor of St. John’s parish. R.H.)
Delphos Herald,
Dec. 2, 1913

All Bobsleds Pressed
into Service

A party of young people sleigh-rided to King’s Hall at Ft. Jennings last night and held a dance.

A party of ladies drove to the home of Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Sellett of Ottoville, Tuesday afternoon, where they spent the evening in having a general good time. A supper was served and a royal good time was had by all the ladies. the party was composed of Mesdames O.M. Fettig, Jos. Hotg, Reinemeyer, Jas. Flannagan, Fred Weiter, Lee King, Evan Williams, H.J. Bergfeld, John Fairdree, Wannemacher, Flick, Misses Bertha Flannagan, Setta Reinemeyer.

A party of about fifteen young people sleigh-rided to Ottoville Tuesday evening and enjoyed a pleasant time at Lauer’s Hall.

A merry crowd of young folks repaired to the house of Mr. and Mrs. Peltier, near the river, Tuesday evening where the evening was very pleasantly spent.

The members of St. John’s choir made up a merry sleighing party who drove to the home of Mr. and Mrs. Gerdeman, west of town, Tuesday evening. The evening was spent in games and music and an elegant supper was served.
Delphos Herald,
Feb. 1904

The Power of
Imagination

A friend tells me that dogs are as much under its influence as men, and he has discovered a method by which a tender hearted man can bring up his pup in the way it should go without unnecessary suffering to either party. My friend’s method is to keep in his yard a big tin tub and a thick stick. When his dog has misbehaved, he chains it up close to the tub, gives the dog a couple of cuts with the stick, scolds it energetically and then sets to work to larrup the barrel. With every blow on the tub, the dog howls and struggles. By the time my friend has worn himself out upon the barrel the dog has received all the moral good that could have been afforded him by a good whipping and is repentant and conscience stricken for the next three days. In fact, the imaginative animal fancies that he really has had a beating and is as sorry for himself as if he had been half killed.
Delphos Herald,
1895

Youth Killed

Vernon Topp, 23, of New Bremen, Ohio, was killed instantly and his companion, Richard Kohlhorst, 19, also of New Bremen, is in Gibbons Hospital at Celina with a fracture of the left leg as a result of an automobile accident on Route 29, two miles west of St. Marys, early Sunday morning.
The two young men were en route to Celina when Topp lost control of the car on the road, made slippery by a drizzling rain.
Delphos Herald,
Nov. 12, 1940

Kundert Livery
Stable Changes
Hands Again

The Kundert Livery Barn on North Main street, has changed hands for the second time in the past few weeks, Charles and John Hesseling, well-known farmers living near Delphos, having made a deal Thursday afternoon whereby they acquired the ownership from G.W. Williams, who bought the establishment about five weeks ago.
Delphos Herald,
Dec. 3, 1940

Notice Farmers

We have established a good market for kiln dried out corn, starch feed and feed meal and will be needing local corn to fill truck orders. Have been buying new corn locally for past six weeks. If you have new corn to offer, see us about selling.
The Garman Grain Co.
Delphos Herald,
Dec. 4, 1940

Destroyed by
Fire Friday

The completely modern frame dwelling about one and one-half miles southeast of Landeck owned by Fred Miller and occupied by his son, Otto, was totally destroyed by fire Friday night, the family having left about 7:30.
The fire was discovered about 8:30 and the Delphos community fire truck was called. Due to the heavy wind and the head start of the flames, the home was beyond saving when the fire truck arrived. Efforts were directed to saving several out-buildings, including a garage. The home and contents loss was estimated at approximately $5,000, which was covered by insurance.
The origin of the fire is not known.
Delphos Herald,
Dec. 7, 1940

Bicycles Stolen
Local police have been notified of the theft of two bicycles from St. John’s school ground Friday night. One taken is the property of Robert Macke and the other belongs to Vergil German.

Two Hoboes Ordered
Out of Town

Two hoboes selling pencils in the business district were ordered out of town by Mayor W.D. Swihart when complaints were received that they were creating a nuisance.
Delphos Herald,
Nov. 4, 1940

Speed Bus
Turned out by
Gramm-Kincaid

A new type of passenger car which the Gramm-Kincaid company is building is attracting considerable attention here at the present time.
The chassis for the second of these machines has just been completed and was driven through the business portion of Delphos Wednesday. This machine will go to the Schaefer Wagon company, dealers for the Gramm-Kincaid company at Canton, Ohio.
The first of the machines turned out by the company is now being fitted with its body and then will be driven to North Hampton, Mass., sold to Hector Arell, of that place.
Two more machines are being erected to go to Florida. Orders for more of the same type have been received.
The new machine is an 18-20 passenger sedan speed bus. It is equipped with a 70 H.P. motor and will develop a speed of 60 miles an hour.
Delphos Herald,
Dec. 30, 1925

Another government grant was received Wednesday for a Model E, for Point Barrow Veterans hospital, located at Perry Point, Ind.
Gramm Motors, Inc. has over 500 dealers throughout the United States, and in spite of the depression the business has shown a decided upward trend for June which was the best month for nearly a year.
The local truck company also specializes in building fire truck chassis and Tuesday an order was received from the government for a six-hundred gallon pumper through one of the fire apparatus companies for whom Gramm Motors Inc. built the chassis. This truck will be placed in operation in Camp Sherman in Chillicothe.
This company has been in Delphos for nearly six years, being in constant operation during that time throughout the depression.
Delphos Herald,
July 1, 1931

Gramm Motors
Plans Expansion

B.A. Gramm stated that the year 1931 opened up with the best January business in years. Twenty-five orders were received this week showing that the air of optimism concerning the motor truck industry is well founded.
New uses for motor trucks are opening up and the demand is constantly increasing.
Gramm Motors Inc. has just developed three new models for the third largest motor car company in the world. They have already been shipping them to over one hundred civilized ports and are looking forward to a considerable increase in exports. These new models will also be offered domestically.
The line of Gramm heavy duty model is being handled in export by the Willys  Export Corp. of Toledo, and the Willys-Overland Company, Stockport, England.
Gramm Motors Inc., have been successful in closing a five-year contract with a very large Chicago Company, for whom they are to start in a few weeks time, the building of trucks under their name for their various connections abroad.
This business is all financed by themselves and will make a very valuable connection to the stockholders.
The Delphos company has for several years, off and on, been doing some engineering on fire apparatus and the past year has been developing four sizes and now have contracts with five fire companies, and furnishing them with the chassis that they finish and put out under their names.
They have a reputation in the U.S. as builders of about the finest long distance equipment for big warehousemen to date.
They were the first to engineer a practical low-to-the-ground rolling store chassis and have quite a few of these in operation now, whose success is outstanding.
Delphos Herald,
Jan. 17, 1931

 

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