July 28, 2014

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Editorial
It’s the journey, not the destination PDF Print
Saturday, July 26, 2014 8:00 PM

What if you could see into the future and you could preview your life for the next five years? Would you really want to know what’s going to happen to you and your family in advance?

Before you say yes, ask yourself if it would depress you to know the bad things that were going to happen. Wouldn’t you feel cheated missing the delightful surprise of the good things that are bound to happen?

The thought of predicting the future fascinates many of yes. We can make educated guesses, but the fact is, no one knows for sure what will happen in the future.

In a similar vain, American author Dorothy Fisher once wrote, “It is not good for all our wishes to be filled; through sickness we recognize the value of health; through evil, the value of good; through hunger, the value of food; through exertion, the value of rest.”

When a new year begins, experts attempt to predict the trends. Some do it for pure entertainment. Others are paid big bucks to give investors and business leaders a head start. Many pregnant couples opt to wait to find out the sex of their child, adding to the excitement.

If fortune tellers were legit, they would all be rich…winning all the big lottery jackpots. We want to believe there is a pot at the end of the rainbow. Life is full of mysteries and unexpected surprises.

Medical researchers may offer the best hope of peeking into the future. They are finding ways to predetermine if people are predisposed to serious illnesses, such as cancer, heart disease and other life-altering ailments.

People must decide. Do they want to know their future? The answers may be good, or bad. Part of the beauty of life is the uncertainty.

Would you read a 500-page mystery novel if you knew the secret ending in advance? Are movies as good when you have already seen the ending? Would you pay $2,000 to attend a major sporting event if you knew who was going to win?

The present is the gift. It’s not the destination that thrills us, it is the journey getting there. What we really crave, and what keeps us motivated is the excitement and the suspense of tomorrow. What’s just around the corner.

Last Updated on Sunday, July 27, 2014 7:41 PM
 
Dreamers see dramatically different future PDF Print
Saturday, July 19, 2014 8:00 PM

BY BYRON MCNUTT

Every phase of your life could be subject to change in just the next 10 years as innovators tinker with the status quo … regardless of the consequences those changes might have on our lives.

In decades past, revolutionary changes may have taken five years to take hold. Today, dramatic changes can sweep the country, the world, in a matter of months.

Traditional ways of doing things can be turned upside down almost over night. This can be very disturbing and it makes many people uncomfortable. Some of the breakthroughs are life changing and totally disrupt lives.

Well, visionaries say we haven’t seen anything, yet! In the immediate future, everything is about to change again and again. Many people can’t afford to keep up.

The Wall Street Journal marked its 125th anniversary July 8 with a special section. They asked leading thinkers, innovators and artists to share their visions of where the world is headed.

 
Cantor’s swan song PDF Print
Saturday, July 12, 2014 8:00 PM

By KATHLEEN PARKER

 

WASHINGTON — About that stunning defeat.

Conventional Wisdom, that self-righteous propagandist, has it that Republican House Majority Leader Eric Cantor’s trouncing by an academic, tea-sipping nobody marks the end of the GOP establishment.

The tea party candidate crushed Cantor, they say. The old-guard Republican Party is toast! It’s over. Finito.

And those were the Democrats talking.

Funny thing is, the tea party folks had been saying more or less the same thing, for exactly the same reason. It fit the narrative that served both groups. The tea party was losing its power to overthrow the titans. Witness the primary victories of a couple of old-timer targets, South Carolina’s Lindsey Graham and Kentucky’s Mitch McConnell.

The Democratic Party was losing its narrative that the tea party wacko-birds control the GOP.

Thus, Dave Brat, the Republican nominee for Cantor’s seat, was a gift from Google. Or God. But I repeat myself. The narrative is back, baby!

In the nation’s capital, the mourning for Cantor was over faster than a Rick Perry gay fundraiser. It is an awesome day — or something — when Nancy Pelosi and Ted Cruz are grinning about the same state of affairs. You don’t know whether to signal Scotty to beam you up or whistle for Toto.

 
Basic education for all pilots PDF Print
Saturday, July 12, 2014 8:00 PM

BY BYRON MCNUTT

The Eagle River Airport is a valuable asset for the greater Vilas County area. The daily airplane traffic and the number of hangars you find on the grounds tells us of its importance to the area’s economy.

The following “20 rules for flight” actually came from people at the Tomahawk Regional Airport. I’d guess anyone with a pilot’s license has seen this list and can attest to their validity.

1. Every takeoff is optional. Every landing is mandatory.

2. If you push the stick forward, the houses get bigger. If you pull the stick back, they get smaller. That is, unless you keep pulling the stick all the way back, then they get bigger again.

3. Flying is not dangerous. Crashing is what’s dangerous.

4. It’s always better to be down here wishing you were up there rather than up there wishing you were down here.

5. The only time you can have too much fuel is when you’re on fire.

6. The propeller is just a big fan in front of the plane which is used to keep the pilot cool. When it stops you can actually see the pilot sweating.

7. When in doubt hold on to your altitude. No one has ever collided with the sky.

8. A good landing is one from which you can walk away. A great landing is one after which you can use the plane again.

9. Learn from the mistakes of others. You won’t live long enough to make all of them yourself.

10. You know you’ve landed with the wheels up if it takes full power to taxi to the ramp.

11. The probability of survival is inversely proportional to the angle of arrival. Large angle of arrival, small likelihood of survival, and vice versa.

12. Stay out of clouds. The silver lining everyone keeps talking about might be another airplane going in the opposite direction. Reliable sources also report that mountains tend to hide out in clouds.

13. Always try to keep the number of landings you make equal to the number of takeoffs you’ve made.

14. You start out with a bag full of luck and an empty bag of experience. The trick is to fill the bag with experience before you empty the bag of luck.

15. Helicopters can’t actually fly. They’re just so darned ugly that the earth repels them.

16. It’s always a good idea to keep the pointy end going forward as much as possible.

17. Keep looking around. There’s always something you’ve missed. Why are there no parachutes or flotation vests?

18. There are three simple rules for making a smooth landing. Unfortunately, no one knows what they are!

19. In the ongoing battle between objects made of aluminum going hundreds of miles an hour and the ground going zero miles an hour, the ground has yet to lose.

20. Remember, gravity is not just a good idea. It’s the law.

 
Tips for healthier, happier life PDF Print
Saturday, July 05, 2014 8:00 PM

About 15 years ago a colleague of mine came across a list of 20 ways to make our lives more pleasant. Some of them relieve stress, some are timesavers and all will lead you to a healthier, happier way of life.

The advice is good for people of all ages. Most are simple, common sense ways to face life’s challenges. See how many you can embrace.

1. Get enough sleep. If necessary, use an alarm clock to remind you to go to bed on time.

2. Don’t rely solely on your memory. Write down when to pick up the laundry, when library books are due, etc.

3. Don’t put up with things that don’t work right. If something is a constant aggravation, get it fixed or replace it.

4. Plan ahead. Don’t let the gas tank get below one-quarter full, keep a well-stocked “emergency shelf” of supplies at home.

5. Make friends with nonworriers. Stress is contagious.

6. An instant cure for most stress: 30 minutes of brisk walking or other aerobic exercise.

7. Forget about counting to 10. Count to 1,000 before doing something or saying anything that could make matters worse. Another way—write out your anger in the sand near the water’s edge.

8. Take your scissors to your credit cards. Wait until you can pay cash for things you don’t absolutely need.

9. Think of your next embarrassing situation as an episode on TV’s “Candid Camera.”

10. Every day, make time for some solitude.

11. Schedule a realistic day. Allow ample time between appointments so you don’t have to rush, worry and apologize for being late.

12. Talk it out. Discussing your problem with a trusted friend can help clear your mind of confusion so you can concentrate on problem solving.

 
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