August 20, 2014

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Editorial
Honor all veterans on Memorial Day PDF Print
Saturday, May 24, 2014 8:00 PM

PEOPLE MAKE THE DIFFERENCE

By Byron McNutt

 

Memorial Day is a time to honor those men and women who fought bravely and made the greatest sacrifice one can make to defend liberty - their lives.

Too often, we take for granted the ideals for which our ancestors fought. It may be easy to forget because only 6 percent of Americans younger than 65 have served in uniform.

We must constantly remind ourselves that freedom isn’t free. It shouldn’t be an inconvenience for us to take a few minutes on Monday to honor those veterans.

In all, more than 1.2 million Americans have died in wars since our country was founded. Millions more were injured. They were the sons and daughters, grand-children, cousins, nieces, nephews and parents of tens of millions of people.

Who will remember those who gave the last full measure of devotion to the cause of justice, freedom and democracy if not those who live under the protection of these great principles?

While Memorial Day is for veterans of all wars, we are paying special tribute to the men and women, mostly in their 80s and 90s, who served in World War II more than 70 years ago.

In short order, the special tributes will fall to veterans of the Korean War and to the Viet Nam War. As these noble warriors march quietly into eternity, they don’t ask for your praises, they only ask to be remembered.

World War II was about more than the maps, dates and places taught in schools today:

- It was about the 17-year-old boys nearly freezing to death in a foxhole and awakening to hear the rumble of tanks as a massive German offensive began.

- It was about praying that your plane, perforated by enemy bullets and shrapnel, could somehow limp across the vastness of the Pacific Ocean to safety.

- It was about overcoming gut-wrenching fear to charge a machine-gun bunker after watching its fanatical defenders massacre your comrades.

- And it was about searching among the dead for your closest friend and wondering “Why him and not me?”

They were ordinary men and women, many of them just children, thrust into extraordinary circumstances. They bore the burden of defending freedom and our way of life, not just for us but also for most of the world.

They did it for their country, they did it for their ideals, and they did it for their buddy in the next foxhole. And thank God for us they did it so well.

Today, we have the best-trained, best-equipped fighting forces in the world. The free world looks to America to police the world and protect them from evil forces.

As we’ve learned the last 15 years, massive power alone will not win the war. It still takes men and women willing to put their lives in danger. They deserve our unwavering support and gratitude.

 
Turning the tide of drug abuse in our communities PDF Print
Saturday, May 10, 2014 8:00 PM

BY U.S. SENATOR

ROB PORTMAN

 

Over the past few weeks, I traveled across our state, visiting with small business owners, steel workers, and students to hear their views on the challenges facing our communities. While they often spoke about how to create more jobs, bring down the cost of healthcare, and get our economy moving again, there was one issue that was on a lot of people’s minds—illegal drug use and how to prevent and treat it, especially in the wake of a heroin epidemic that is taking the lives of four Ohioans every day.

I have been involved in this issue for more than twenty years. In 1995, I joined with leaders from across southwest Ohio to form the Coalition for a Drug-Free Greater Cincinnati. I served as chair of the coalition for nine years, and I’ve taken the knowledge I’ve gained from that experience to author half a dozen laws that marshal resources and channel them towards proven approaches in drug prevention and treatment.

 
Congressman requests hearing on Redskins name PDF Print
Saturday, May 10, 2014 8:00 PM

WASHINGTON (AP) — A member of Congress is requesting a hearing on the Washington Redskins’ name, calling it “another example of racial insensitivity in sports” in the wake of Donald Sterling’s lifetime ban from the NBA.

Rep. Henry Waxman, D-Calif., sent a letter Friday to the chairman of the Committee on Energy and Commerce citing the derogatory nature of the word “redskins” and suggesting the committee use its influence to persuade team owner Dan Snyder and the NFL to change the name.

 
GOP: Choose wisely or reap the whirlwind PDF Print
Saturday, April 26, 2014 8:29 PM

WASHINGTON — The Cliven Bundy spectacle in Nevada has provided a Wild West backdrop for our hottest political issues as we gallop toward the midterm elections.

Politically, the conflict between the Bureau of Land Management and the Bundy family has highlighted the importance of picking one’s battles wisely. Suffice to say, a smattering of pundits and politicians drank from the wrong chalice.

 
A step in the right direction for Delphi workers PDF Print
Saturday, April 19, 2014 8:00 PM

BY U.S. SENATOR

ROB PORTMAN

Last week, we were able to win a small, but important victory for the 20,000 families of Delphi salaried retirees who lost up to 70 percent of their pensions because of the actions of the Obama Administration. I was able to secure an amendment in the Finance Committee that will extend the Health Coverage Tax Credit (HCTC), legislation that will help Delphi retirees attain affordable healthcare. Often the HCTC serves as an important bridge for older Americans who lost their pensions until they become eligible for Medicare benefits, covering 72.5 percent of their premiums. But on January 1, 2014, that tax credit expired.

Extending this credit is the least we can do for these families who lost everything as a result of the auto bailout. In the summer of 2009, as the government took GM into bankruptcy, the Obama Administration terminated the pension plans covering thousands of Delphi workers.

 
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