July 22, 2014

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A summer vacation for me
Written by Nancy Spencer   
Saturday, June 07, 2014 8:00 PM

Children, children everywhere! School is out for the summer.

Ah. Summer vacation!

Who doesn’t remember the last day of school and endless possibilities that lay ahead?

The last days of school were excruciating. They seemed to drag on for an eternity. It was warm and we all wanted to be outside, not cooped up in a classroom being tested on how much we had paid attention during the school year.

I remember gazing out the classroom window and imagining the fun I was going to have. I lived in a neighborhood packed with kids. The possibilities were endless. The canal was always a place to spend time fishing and catching turtles and crawdads. The park was just a hop, skip and a jump across the canal and always filled with friends and activity.

On first order was a pass to the swimming pool. All the neighborhood kids would race to the pool to be the first one in when the gates opened. Hours of splashing, playing and getting up the nerve to jump off the high-dive followed.

This is where I also cultivated my love for Charleston Chews.

 
Brothers appreciate coverage of building’s demolition
Written by Staff Reports   
Saturday, June 07, 2014 8:00 PM | Updated ( Sunday, June 08, 2014 7:25 PM )

To the editor,

My brother, Alfred Schmit, and I would like to thank The Delphos Herald for the excellent coverage given to the recent demolition of the former Schmit’s Market building at Second and Canal streets in Delphos.

Our father, Nicholas Schmit, was the former owner of the Schmit and Patton Grocery during the 1920s and 30s. Dad died in 1935 and left our mother with eight children. The grocery provided mother and her eight children with an income during The Great Depression and World War II.

Brothers Jerome and Alfred both served in the Army during the war. Jerome is now deceased but he was also a partner in the grocery.

 
Insightful observations from 1955
Written by Byron McNutt   
Saturday, June 07, 2014 8:00 PM

If you’re at least 60 years-old, you need to share the following with your kids and grandkids. These are comments made by folks in the mid-1950s and are in stark contrast with how we live today.

Sure, times have changed. Young folks today can’t imagine how their grandparents and great-grandparents, recovering from WWII and the Korean War, could possibly live and support a family while earning less than $100 a week.

There is a movement today about raising the minimum wage to $10.10 an hour, or as high as $15 per hour. Well, back in 1955, the federal minimum wage was raised from 75 cents per hour to $1 per hour on August 12.

I’ve heard people say they think they had more discretionary money and buying power 40 years ago than they have today. They made much less per week but they could buy the things they needed and still have money left over. Not the case today.

What happened? Everything has been supersized. We had limited options back then and we were more able to get along with smaller expectations.

In the 1950s, if you were fortunate to have a television, you probably got three channels, and they were free. No one dreamed that one day we’d pay for programming. If you had a telephone, it was on a party line. Probably cost less than $3 per month. Needy families only had toilet paper on Fridays!

Okay, here’s a list of comments made in 1955, just 59 years ago. After you’ve read them, make a list of things true today that might seem just as outrageous just 20 years from now.

- I’ll tell you one thing, if things keep going the way they are, it’s going to be impossible to buy a week’s groceries for $20.

- Have you seen the new cars coming out next year? It won’t be long before $2,000 will only buy a used one.

- If cigarettes keep going up in price, I’m going to be forced to quit smoking. A quarter a pack is ridiculous.

- Did you hear, the post office is thinking about charging a dime just to mail a letter!

- If they raise the minimum wage to $1, nobody will be able to hire outside help at the store.

- When I first started driving, who would have thought gas would someday cost 29 cents a gallon. Guess we’d be better off leaving the car in the garage.

- Those duck tail hair cuts are horrible. Next thing you know boys will be wearing their hair as long as the girls.

 
Eating Michelle’s lunch
Written by Kathleen Parker   
Saturday, June 07, 2014 8:00 PM | Updated ( Sunday, June 08, 2014 7:08 PM )

WASHINGTON — To hear tell, the mean ol’ GOP is waging war on Michelle Obama and, brace yourself, America’s children.

Got it?

The newest war on women/children relates to the first lady’s well-intentioned but disastrous school nutrition program, otherwise known as the Dumpster Derby.

First to good intentions:

Kudos to Obama for recognizing and trying to address childhood obesity. If you think health care is expensive now, wait until these little human pillows reach adulthood and then, assuming their hearts hold out, advanced age. Assuming, too, that our bottom-line bureaucrats haven’t begun recycling high-maintenance humans by then. Might want to keep an eye on the Soylent Green market.

No, I’m not suggesting death panels. I’m employing hyperbole in the service of a point, the necessary clarification of which highlights our mind-numbing politics and our nation’s diminishing sentience.

The first lady’s “Let’s Move!” program and her focus on whole foods (as opposed to fast) and water instead of sodas have been welcome developments. Who better to bring needed attention to such issues? Obama is merely expanding her maternal focus to include all those public school kids whose mothers apparently have forgotten how to make a sandwich. Or whose fathers have forgotten to say, “Get those plugs out of your ears and make friends with the lawn mower” — or whatever its urban comparable.

 
Strive to make a difference
Written by Byron McNutt   
Saturday, May 31, 2014 8:00 PM | Updated ( Friday, May 30, 2014 8:50 PM )

Another school year is drawing to a close. In the next few weeks there will be words of wisdom offered to this year’s graduates.

Parents, teachers and representatives from all walks of life will provide encouragement as these young men and women take their place in the world.

At a few universities, graduating seniors used social media to protest against a few proposed commencement speakers that ardent activists didn’t want at their respective schools for political reasons. Several speakers decided not to appear where they were not welcome.

Getting the hook were such noteworthy graduation-day speakers as former U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and Christine Lagarde of France, the first woman to head the International Monetary Fund.

Seems strange that students who treasure free speech and robust debate would use their new-found social media powers to disrupt a rite of spring.

Here are some words of wisdom handed down through the ages that are good for people of all ages:

- Teach a child to choose the right path, and when he is older he will remain upon it. The wise man is glad to be instructed. Making poor excuses makes us weak; making tough decisions makes us strong. We usually make a mistake when we make an excuse.

- Cheerfulness is the Golden Rule in action; kindness is the essence of love in action. A cheerful heart is good medicine; a broken spirit causes one to be ill.

- Losers look for excuses; winners search for answers. And, diligent study and intelligent work contain the maps to discovery, the charts to achievement and the blueprints for success.

- The loser misses opportunities by whining, pining, declining and reclining. The winner makes opportunities by going, sowing, growing and knowing.

- The only thing heavier than carrying a chip on our shoulder is carrying a grudge in our heart. And, enthusiasm and confidence fuel the fires of achievement.

- The highway to happiness is helpfulness; the pathway to peace is prayer; and the gateway to gladness is generosity. And, we create our tomorrows hour by hour; we mold our futures moment by moment, day by day.

 
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