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Letter to the Editor-Library Board
Written by Our Viewers   
Monday, April 15, 2013 9:16 AM

DEAR EDITOR:

To the Delphos Community:

The Delphos Public Library has been a part of the Delphos community since 1912. While the library has experienced many changes over the years, one thing has never changed – the overwhelming support that the Delphos community has provided to its library.

The Delphos Public Library serves its community as a lifelong learning center. In 2012, the library was accessed by more than 10,000 patrons and circulated more than 195,800 items. That is an impressive number for a library our size.

In 2013, your Delphos Public Library became a member of the SEO (Serving Every Ohioan) consortium, which provides patrons access to more than 8 million items and the up-to-date ability to download e-books to personal reading devices free of charge. Passage of this Renewal Levy will ensure that exciting and educational programs continue to be available for children of all ages; that patrons will continue to have access to books, magazines, music, videos, genealogy programs, computers and online programs; and that the Delphos Public Library will continue to have the necessary funds to provide quality library services to the Delphos community in the future. This is not a new tax – it is a renewal of the current 0.6 mil levy which provides 13 percent of the library’s annual budget.

Please vote “yes” on May 7 for the Delphos Library 0.6 mil Levy Renewal. The Delphos Public Library needs your support.

Thank you.

Delphos Public Library Board of Trustees

 

Leila Osting

Patricia Poling

Janet Rutledge

Brad Rostorfer

Susan Kapcar

Ron Elwer

Jim Looser

 
Letter to the Editor - Buettner
Written by Our Viewers   
Monday, April 15, 2013 9:14 AM

DEAR EDITOR,

I am writing in reference to the proposed Dog Creek wind farm that will be located west of Delphos in Van Wert County. The developer, Iberdrola Renewables is headquartered in Bilbao, Spain. These are the same people that developed the Blue Creek farm further west in Van Wert County.

As I have researched wind farms, I have become increasingly more concerned. There are so many negative issues with these wind turbines.

When I first heard of the proposed Dog Creek farm it was almost a year after the landowners were being approached. I was amazed that we were never told of this. I thought if this is such a good thing, why are people not talking about it? Usually, when good things happen, people are celebrating the news. So if this wind farm is such a good thing for this community why does the developer want so desperately to keep it quiet? This was the first red flag for me.

The success or failure of the Dog Creek wind farm falls squarely on the shoulders of the landowners west of Delphos. Many have already signed leases to allow for the turbines, many have not. All of these land owners are hard working farmers whose families have been good stewards of this land for generations. They have worked hard to preserve a way of life to be proud of. They have helped to build a strong community that we can all be proud of.

Now, at this time, this way of life is being threatened. It is our turn to stand up for what is right and not allow this to happen. We need to protect this land for our children and grandchildren. These wind turbines have the potential to destroy our way of life and cause many problems in our community. It has happened all across this country and will happen here as well, if the Dog Creek wind farm becomes a reality.

In closing, I would like to say that nothing in life is truly free, everything has a price. These turbines may seem like a good idea to some, but there will be a price, and it will be paid by all of us, the landowners, our children, our neighbors and the citizens of our city, our state and our country.

Molly Buettner

Delphos

 
Letter to the Editor-Klausing
Written by Our Viewers   
Monday, April 15, 2013 9:09 AM

DEAR EDITOR:

Are you aware Iberdrola Renewables, a division of Iberdrola SA of Spain, is in Delphos commissioning landowners to give up their land to build 150 wind turbines?

These 550-foot-tall turbines will connect to the already built monstrosities in Van Wert. YOUR tax dollars are subsidizing the construction of these turbines.

After learning from a real estate agent that the property value of homes located in the wind farms have decreased, it angers and frustrates me to see people being taken advantage of.

It’s up to you to educate yourself about what is being forced upon us. Just because you did not sign a lease or easement does not mean you won’t be directly impacted. Please educate yourself. Go to: noauglaizewind.wordpress.com or windworrier.com or type in “you tube turbine flicker” to see actual footage of shadow flicker and turbine noise.

Please voice your opposing opinion and help prevent the rest of the landowners from signing over their valuable property. If you would like a “No Wind Turbine” sign, please email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mary Kay Klausing,

Delphos

 

 
Hold the printer ink, please
Written by Nancy Spencer   
Monday, April 15, 2013 8:01 AM

In our Good Times publication, there is a section that highlights the prices of the everyday items we all use, like eggs, milk, bread, etc., for a certain year.

In 1958, for example, a house cost $30,000; the average income was $4,650; milk was $1.01 a gallon; and gas was 24 cents a gallon. Yes, 24 cents a gallon. You can’t even get a gum ball for that now.

We watch in amazement as the price jumps 30 and even more cents from the time we get to work until lunch. Then, sometimes, it even changes again that same day.

Someone needs to tell me what  in the world could happen to cause that.

Someone needs to tell me how the big gas companies can stand in front of the American people and announce their profits and not feel guilty because that money is made off the backs of the American people.

How much is enough? You hear where companies lose millions in a quarter and you think, wow, that’s a lot. But what you don’t realize is that is not really how much they lost. That’s how much less they made than the quarter before. Wah!

Since there seems no help in sight and those fat cats lining their pockets with my money, I’m going to do the only thing I know how to do. I’m going to make it funny. Because if I don’t, I might cry.

Here is an e-mail from my mom. Who else? It is someone who obviously has way too much time on their hands and access to a calculator.

I don’t know where it originated. By the time you get to the end, you won’t either. Gas prices will still be sky high and someone else will be making money every time you fill up.

So buck up ’lil campers and check into that moped, scooter, bicycle, motorcycle or whatever you have kicked around driving to combat the high price of gas.

 

Think a gallon of gas is expensive?

Diet Snapple 16 oz $1.29 —  $10.32 per gallon

Lipton Ice Tea 16 oz $1.19 — $9.52 per gallon

Gatorade 20 oz $1.59 — $10.17 per gallon

Ocean Spray 16 oz $1.25 — $10 per gallon

Brake fluid 12 oz $3.15 — $33.60 per gallon

Vick’s Nyquil 6 oz $8.35 — $178.13 per gallon

Pepto Bismol 4 oz $3.85 — $123.20 per gallon

Whiteout 7 oz $1.39 — $25.42 per gallon

Scope 1.5 oz $0.99 — $84.48 per gallon

And — this is the REAL KICKER ...

Evian water 9 oz $1.49 — $21.19 per gallon! $21.19 for WATER and the buyers don’t even know the source. (Evian spelled backwards is Naive.)

Ever wonder why printers are so cheap?

So they have you hooked for the ink. Someone calculated the cost of the ink at — you won’t believe it but it is true — $5,200 a gal.

So the next time you’re at the pump, be glad your car doesn’t run on water, Scope, or Whiteout, Pepto Bismol, Nyquil or, God forbid, printer ink!

 
Hold the printer ink, please
Written by Nancy Spencer   
Saturday, April 13, 2013 1:03 AM

In our Good Times publication, there is a section that highlights the prices of the everyday items we all use, like eggs, milk, bread, etc., for a certain year.
In 1958, for example, a house cost $30,000; the average income was $4,650; milk was $1.01 a gallon; and gas was 24 cents a gallon. Yes, 24 cents a gallon. You can’t even get a gum ball for that now.

We watch in amazement as the price jumps 30 and even more cents from the time we get to work until lunch. Then, sometimes, it even changes again that same day.

Someone needs to tell me what  in the world could happen to cause that.

Someone needs to tell me how the big gas companies can stand in front of the American people and announce their profits and not feel guilty because that money is made off the backs of the American people.

How much is enough? You hear where companies lose millions in a quarter and you think, wow, that’s a lot. But what you don’t realize is that is not really how much they lost. That’s how much less they made than the quarter before. Wah!

 
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