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DELPHOS — March Madness is in full swing. Come in and enjoy some silly St. Paddy’s themed snacks, games and crafts on us! For children ages 3-7 and their grandparents will meet in the activity room on March 11 from 4-5 p.m. for a Grand Afternoon.

Matisse and Me - Preschool Art Program will be held from 5-6 p.m. on March 19 in the activity room. Children ages 3-7 will learn to create mini-masterpieces in the style of Henri Matisse using stamps and pre-cut shapes. A perfect way to introduce young children to simple art skills and a great way to work on color and fine motor skills.

Love the Wimpy kid books? Come to the Wimpy kid mega program at 4 p.m. on March 21. This program is for kindergartners to fifth-graders.

DVD’s added to the collection for the month

Bernie the Dolphin

Boy Erased

Christopher Robin

The Girl in the Spider’s Web

Grinch

Harry the Bunny

Hunter Killer

Johnny English Strikes Again

Minnie. Bow Be Mine

Peg + Cat: Out of this world

Peg + Cat: Out on a limb

Robin Hood

A Star Is Born

Venom

Widows

The Wife

Music CD’s

A Dog’s Way Home: Original Soundtrack

Experiment

Now That’s What I Call Music #69

20 Years of Hits

Wow Gospel 2019

Nonfiction

100 Parks, 5,000 Ideas: Where to Go, When to Go, What to See, What to Do by Joe Yogerst

In the sequel to the best-selling 50 States, 5,000 ideas, National Geographic turns to the United States’ and Canada’s most pristine—and adventure-filled—national, state, and city parks with 5,000 ideas for the ultimate vacation. Showcasing the best experiences, both obvious and unexpected, each entry in this robust guide provides an overview of the park, detailed travel advice, fascinating facts, insider knowledge about wildlife, and expert tips for hiking, biking, camping, and exploring. From the geysers of Yellowstone National Park to the Everglades’ Nine Mile Pond Canoe Trail and the stunning peaks of Banff and Jasper in Alberta, each page will fuel your wanderlust. Plus, explore the natural beauty tucked away in cities like New York’s Central Park and Boston Commons, and find bonus parks with day-trip suggestions to nearby neighbors. Top 10 lists throughout highlight best-of destinations for river trips, monuments, panoramic views, beaches, and more. This comprehensive book provides all the inspiration and information you need to plan your next park visit—and make it a memorable one.

The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee: Native America from 1890 to the Present by David Treuer

Growing up Ojibwe on a reservation in Minnesota, training as an anthropologist, and researching Native life past and present for his nonfiction and novels, David Treuer has uncovered a different narrative. Because they did not disappear—and not despite but rather because of their intense struggles to preserve their language, their traditions, their families, and their very existence—the story of American Indians since the end of the nineteenth century to the present is one of unprecedented resourcefulness and reinvention. In The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee, Treuer melds history with reportage and memoir. Tracing the tribes’ distinctive cultures from first contact, he explores how the depredations of each era spawned new modes of survival. The devastating seizures of land gave rise to increasingly sophisticated legal and political maneuvering that put the lie to the myth that Indians don’t know or care about property. The forced assimilation of their children at government-run boarding schools incubated a unifying Native identity. Conscription in the US military and the pull of urban life brought Indians into the mainstream and modern times, even as it steered the emerging shape of self-rule and spawned a new generation of resistance. The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee is the essential, intimate story of a resilient people in a transformative era.

Tin Cans and Greyhounds: The Destroyers that Won Two World Wars by Clint Johnson

For men on destroyer-class warships during World War I and World War II, battles were waged “against overwhelming odds from which survival could not be expected.” Those were the words Lieutenant Commander Robert Copeland calmly told his crew as their tiny, unarmored destroyer escort rushed toward giant, armored Japanese battleships at the Battle off Samar on October 25, 1944. This action-packed narrative history of destroyer-class ships brings readers inside the half-inch-thick hulls to meet the men who fired the ships’ guns, torpedoes, hedgehogs, and depth charges. Nicknamed “tin cans” or “greyhounds,” destroyers were fast escort and attack ships that proved indispensable to America’s military victories. Beginning with destroyers’ first incarnation as torpedo boats in 1874 and ending with World War II, author Clint Johnson shares the riveting stories of the Destroyer Men who fought from inside a “tin can”—risking death by cannons, bombs, torpedoes, fire, and drowning. The British invented destroyers, the Japanese improved them, and the Germans failed miserably with them. It was the Americans who perfected destroyers as the best fighting ship in two world wars. Tin Cans & Greyhounds compares the designs of these countries with focus on the old, modified World War I destroyers, and the new and numerous World War II destroyers of the United States. Tin Cans & Greyhounds details how destroyers fought submarines, escorted convoys, rescued sailors and airmen, downed aircraft, shelled beaches, and attacked armored battleships and cruisers with nothing more than a half-inch of steel separating their crews from the dark waves.

Fiction

We Hope for Better Things by Erin Bartels

When Detroit Free Press reporter Elizabeth Balsam meets James Rich, his strange request—that she look up a relative she didn’t know she had in order to deliver an old camera and a box of photos—seems like it isn’t worth her time. But when she loses her job after a botched investigation, she suddenly finds herself with nothing but time. At her great-aunt’s 150-year-old farmhouse north of Detroit, Elizabeth uncovers a series of mysterious items, locked doors, and hidden graves. As she searches for answers to the riddles around her, the remarkable stories of two women who lived in this very house emerge as testaments to love, resilience, and courage in the face of war, racism, and misunderstanding. And as Elizabeth soon discovers, the past is never as past as we might like to think. Debut novelist Erin Bartels takes readers on an emotional journey through time—from the volatile streets of 1960s Detroit to the Michigan’s Underground Railroad during the Civil War—to uncover the past, confront the seeds of hatred, and discover where love goes to hide.

The Conspiracy by Kat Martin

Harper Winston’s brother has disappeared. Pursuing his dream of sailing the Caribbean, Michael hasn’t responded to texts or emails in days. When even the Coast Guard can’t find him, Harper is forced to take desperate measures. Which means going to Chase Garrett, once her brother’s best friend, now the only man she can trust…or so she hopes? As the successful owner of Maximum Security, Chase has learned to trust his gut. He knows Harper’s father is mixed up in a deadly business, and suspects there’s more to Michael’s disappearance than meets the eye. Getting involved again with the Winston’s goes against everything he stands for, yet old loyalties die hard. As the case draws him closer to Harper and deeper into the Winston’s’ snarled crime family, he is forced to put everything on the line to keep Harper safe…and both of them alive.

American Duchess: A Novel of Consuelo Vanderbilt by Karen Harper

On a cold November day in 1895, a carriage approaches St Thomas Episcopal Church on New York City’s Fifth Avenue. Massive crowds surge forward, awaiting their glimpse of heiress Consuelo Vanderbilt. Just 18, the beautiful bride has not only arrived late, but in tears, yet her marriage to the aloof Duke of Marlborough proceeds. Bullied into the wedding by her indomitable mother, Alva, Consuelo loves another. But a deal was made, trading some of the vast Vanderbilt wealth for a title and prestige, and Consuelo, bred to obey, realizes she must make the best of things.

At Blenheim Palace, Consuelo is confronted with an overwhelming list of duties, including producing an “heir and a spare,” but her relationship with the duke quickly disintegrates. Consuelo finds an inner strength, charming everyone from debutantes to diplomats including Winston Churchill, as she fights for women’s suffrage. And when she takes a scandalous leap, can she hope to attain love at last…?

From the Children’s Corner

Outwalkers by Fiona Shaw (Juvenile Fiction)

The story is set in England in the near future. Outwalkers follows along with a gang of kids and their perilous journey to make it through a country where the government is tracking everyone and their every move is analyzed and controlled. They must use their wits and each other to survive and escape.

Rotten! Vultures, Beetles, Slime, and Nature’s Other Decomposers by Anita Sanchez (Juvenile Non-Fiction)

What’s that terrible smell? It’s the revolting scent of rot. But being rotten isn’t necessarily bad. If nothing ever rotted, nothing new could live. This funny and fact-filled look at decomposition in all of its slimy glory, illustrated with dazzling full-color art by Gilbert Ford. Vultures, fungi, dung beetles, and more aid in this fascinating and sometimes smelly aspect of the life cycle that’s right under our noses.

New Shoes by Sara Varon (Juvenile Graphic Novel)

Francis the donkey is the best shoemaker in the village. He uses only the finest materials: coconut wood for the soles, goat’s wool for the insoles, and wild tiger grass for the uppers.

One day he receives a special order from his favorite singer: Miss Manatee, the queen of calypso. But he’s all out of tiger grass! To make the perfect pair of shoes, Francis must journey deep into the jungle and that means leaving his village for the first time.

Pug Pals: Two’s a Crowd by Flora Ahn (Readers Level 3)

Two pugs. One beloved toy bunny. What could go wrong? Sunny’s new little sister, Rosy, is getting her paws into everything. When Rosy takes Sunny’s favorite toy, Mr. Bunny, and loses him, Sunny is barking mad. But when Rosy sets off on her own to find and rescue Mr. Bunny, Sunny starts to worry. Rosy’s never been outside by herself before. Sunny will have to gather all the canine courage she has and go after them-before Rosy and Mr. Bunny are both lost fur-ever!

Mary Wears What She Wants by Keith Negley (Picture Books)

Once upon a time (but not too long ago), girls only wore dresses. And only boys wore pants. Until one day, a young girl named Mary had a bold idea: She would wear whatever she wanted. And she wanted to wear pants! Inspired by the true story of Mary Edwards Walker, a trailblazing doctor who was arrested many times for wearing pants, this fresh, charming picture book encourages readers to think for themselves while gently challenging gender and societal norms.

The Lost Book by Margarita Surnaite (Picture Books)

Everyone in Rabbit Town loves to read. Well, everyone except for Henry, who would much prefer to play outside. Then Henry finds a lost book, and when he tries to track down the owner, he stumbles into the human world. There, the adults are all absorbed in their phones and tablets, and everyone ignores Henry until he befriends a young girl. They have so much fun together that Henry gives her the lost book, knowing it will be in good hands. Henry learns that books can contain adventures all their own, and when he returns to Rabbit Town, for the first time it is Henry who tells the bedtime story.