Columbia, S.C. — Miss Ruby Miller, deaf, dumb and blind since she was five years old, has found one of the greatest comforts in her narrowly bounded life, in radio.



Strangely, while the spoken word means nothing to her — only monotonous vibrations, when she puts earphones on and listens to the radio, she can hear music perfectly.



Miss Miller, now in her teens, is in the tenth grade in school and hopes to go to college.







Delphos Herald,



Jan. 14, 1929



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Improvements Suggested



for Lincoln Highway



and Route 66



Improvements of several roads near Delphos is suggested in a report of a survey of the Ohio state Highway system which has been made by the Ohio Good Road Federation.



This report suggests improvements on the Lincoln Highway, west of Delphos, the Harding Highway, east of this city on State Route 66.



A map suggests the widening of the Lincoln Highway west of Delphos, all the way to the state line with the exception of a short stretch near Convoy, which it suggests should be reconstructed.



The widening of the Harding Highway east from Delphos to Lima and on east through Kenton, Marian, Galion and Mansfield is also suggested with reconstruction needed at some places along the route.



Delphos Herald,



Jan. 14, 1929



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Football and



Basketball League



Formed



A football and basketball league has been formed by a number of high schools in this vicinity. It will be known as the Mid-Western League.



The league is made up of six schools, Van Wert, Celina, Ada, Wapakoneta, St. Marys and Kenton. Some games will be played with teams outside the league.



Delphos Herald,



Jan. 14, 1929



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Receiving Bids for



Centralized School



Building



Seventeen bids for the general contract to build the Hoaglin-Jackson centralized school have been received. There were also numerous bids on various classes of construction and materials.



Bids for the general construction job were mostly between $70,000 and $80,000.



The new building which will house both grade and high school departments, will be located on a 7-acre tract of the Henry Ludwig farm in Hoaglin Township on the north side of Defiance road and about one-fourth mile east of the Hoaglin grocery. The bond issue voted for the school and grounds was $122,000.



Delphos Herald,



Jan. 14, 1929



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Mrs. Babe Ruth



Dies in Fire



Authorities held today the tragic death of Mrs. “Babe” Ruth in a fire in Dr. Edward Kinder’s home was “accidental”, while her brother, Thomas Woodford, insisted foul play was responsible.



The medical examiner declared suffocation in a fire caused the death. The police added that unless additional evidence is forthcoming, they will list it as accidental.



State police are anxious, however, to interview Kinder who disappeared after declaring that, “Mrs. Ruth was Mrs. Kinder.” Kinder was absent from home at the time of the fire.



It was not until yesterday that her identification through Babe Ruth and two sisters was definite. With these identifications there came to light what appeared to be a secret romance in Mrs. Ruth’s life. She and the baseball star had been separated some years.



Kinder’s brother insisted the young doctor was married to her.



But Babe, almost in collapse, said he knew of no divorce and believed Mrs. Ruth was still his wife at the time of her death.



Meantime, indications today were that Kinder’s disappearance was prompted mainly by fear of exposure, for he had given an alibi as to absence from the house.



“I have reason to believe that Mrs. Ruth was the victim of foul play and that the police have not all the facts behind the death of my sister,” Woodford said.



“What is there to prove that the house was not fired? What is there to prove that she wasn’t murdered? I’m not at all satisfied with the police explanation of circumstances of the death of my sister.”



Delphos Herald,



Jan. 12, 1929



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Takes Position



With Kaverman



& Leatherman



R.D. Shaffer, South Clay street, is moving to Ottawa.



Mr. Shaffer was employed with the Mueller Chevrolet company in Delphos for five years past. He will take a position in the service department of the Kaverman & Leatherman company, who have the Chevrolet agency at Ottawa.



Delphos Herald,



Jan. 15, 1929



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Traffic Light Changes



Delphos motorists will again be obliged to watch t he change in lights at Second and Fifth and Main.



The traffic light at Second and Main was placed in operation Monday afternoon and that at Fifth and Main will be placed in service as soon as weather permits.



A new control box which was shipped to Delphos last week is being used and will, it is believed, provide efficient control and keep the lights in operation. Motorists are asked to be careful to stop when the red light is showing on their side.



The lights will be tried out for an indefinite period. If they give satisfaction, they will likely be purchased by the city.



Delphos Herald,



Jan. 22, 1929



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Enlarge Hatchery



Near Landeck



M.M. Youngpeter has enlarged his chick hatchery, which is located five miles south of Delphos and has increased the capacity of the plant from 8,000 to 17,000 eggs. This is one of the very few hatcheries to increase capacity recently. New equipment has been installed, making the hatchery modern in every way. The flocks have also been improved b y culling and breeding some of the flocks with pedigreed males.



Clinic on “Reproduction of Models.” He favored the guests with an interesting account of various materials and for impression taking.



Delphos Herald,



Jan. 22, 1929



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Honey Stolen



Honey thieves are again at work in this vicinity. Colonies of bees belonging to Fred Leininger & Son were disturbed within the past few days and were robbed of honey.



A winter case containing four colonies of bees was overturned and honey was taken from the hives. These colonies were located on the Cletus Foust farm, six miles east of Spencerville.



The greatest loss in these cases is not in the theft of the honey, but the destruction of the colonies.



The owners and the Tri-County Beekeepers’ Association are offering reward of $50 each, a total of $100 for the apprehension of the thieves.



Delphos Herald,



Jan. 22, 1929



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Garman Grain Company



A deal has been completed by which Albert Schlientz retires from part ownership and management of the Garman Grain Company, selling his interest in the concern to G.O. Heist, of Cavette.



Mr. Schlientz came to Delphos more than a year ago at the time when the elevator was enlarged and grain drying equipment was installed. He was manager of the local business of the plant. He has not announced what his plans for the future will be.



The following named are on the board of directors: Loyal Grandstaff, Ferd Suever, Albert Luersman, H.M. Viel, A.L. Garman and G.C. Heist. This board was organized by electing Lloyd Grandstaff as president; Albert Luersman, vice president; and A.L. Garman, secretary-treasurer.